Harvesting and drying herbs

Harvesting and drying herbs

I got my first harvest of the year in, with my herbs which are growing amazingly. So I’m excited to share with you guys how to harvest and dry your herbs. I am going to make this a down a dirty fast how to for harvesting and drying herbs. Because if you are anything like me, you have have 6.7 seconds to read this without some random catastrophe calling your attention. Lets be real, finding time to take care of your garden is hard enough without habing to wade through seven pages before getting to what your here for. So lets jump in!

Parsley

Before harvesting

For parsley, go for your largest leaves. Those are the oldest, the thickest stems. Like with all the herbs we will talk about, leave the new growth so that your plant can continue growing for future harvests.

After harvesting

Basil

Before harvesting

For basil go for the biggest leaves however. When you are looking at your basil leaves, you will see the smaller leaves or new growth growing just above the leaves ready to harvest. So harvest carefully so you only snip off the leaf instead of the whole stem and that way you won’t effect the new growth.

After harvesting

Arugula

Before harvesting

Like our other herbs, here we are heading for the larger leaves. Leave the smaller ones for new growth.

After harvesting

Dill

Before harvesting

Harvest the oldest, most mature stems. Be sure to leave the smaller stems so that they can continue their growth.

After harvesting
Dill

Thyme

Before harvesting

For thyme, you can harvest by snipping the stems as far done as what you want or need. Be sure to leave at least an inch so that your Thyme can continue it’s growth for continued harvests.

Thyme

Drying

There are a few different ways of drying your herbs after harvesting them, such as in the oven or microwave. I myself prefer the hanging method and that is what I will show you. It’s simple and direct. After you are done harvesting your herbs, gather your leaves by the stems and place over a piece of string or yarn. Gentle tie the yarn closed, wind the yarn around the stems and tie a few more times to ensure they are secure. Make sure you do this enough times because as the herbs dry, the stems shrink and you don’t want to loose any by them falling out. Once you’ve tied them, hang them somewhere secure to dry. After they are dry, chop up and add into your herb containers.

Air drying my herbs

If you enjoyed this post, head over and check out my beginner garden planning post! http://mindfulmommybear.com/planning-a-garden-beginners/

Show me your gardens! If you have questions, reach out I’m here for you! If you have always wanted to start a garden but don’t know where to start then check out my FREE beginner garden course! http://mindfulmommybear.com/beginner-garden-course/

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This Post Has 7 Comments

  1. This is so useful! I’m going to try drying some herbs today. I always have extra basil and parsley lying around.

  2. I have never successfully dried herbs, but I really need to start this summer. Thank you so much for sharing!

  3. Such a useful post! I love experimenting with growing my herbs and the information is surely going to help!

  4. This is right on time. We have some herbs growing that would be great for.

  5. I love drying and saving my herbs!. I’ve only dried oregano and sage so far. Definitely pinning this for future reference.

  6. Hey Shayla! This was super informative! You’re so funny, 6.7 seconds to read this before the next big catastrophe is calling… you just called motherhood out! Had me laughing. I too am a mom and you are soooo right! But I had time to slowly read the article and I appreciate you summing it up but at the same time being clear. Very helpful. Your herbs look great too by the way! I’m excited my harvest of herbs is coming up in the next 2-3 weeks at least for my indoor one. I am prepping for my outside garden now and it’s my favorite time of year!

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